Wellness & Aesthetics Centers

How To Stay Healthy While Flying

Whether you only travel occasionally or consider yourself an air travel expert, it’s smart to be proactive about staying healthy when you fly. Airports and airplanes play host to millions of people and their germs, stress and travel go hand-in-hand and access to healthy food can be a challenge. AUTHOR Dr. Terri DeNeui, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC CATEGORY Healthy Travel Tips SOCIAL @EVEXIASMEDICAL The following travel tips will help protect you in the air and on the road. Tip No. 1: Know where germs tend to lurk on airplanes and at airports. Would you believe that tray tables harbor mega germs on airplanes? According to a 2015 study by Travelmath, a microbiologist found that tray tables—with 2,155 CFU (colony forming units)/sq. inch—carried eight times the amount of bacteria that lavatory flush

Speed Training Shows Promise in Putting Off Dementia – What Else Can You Do?

A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques.   There is new hope for preventing a tragic, incurable disease which affects more than five million Americans who are 65 and older – dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, “A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques. Researchers found that a total of 11 to 14 hours of speed training has the potential to cut by as much as 48 percent the risk of developing dementia 10 years later.”The results of this study, entitled "Advanced Cognitive Training

How Balancing Hormones Can Help You Lose Weight and Keep it Off

The trajectory of worldwide obesity rates has been on a steady climb for more than 30 years. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the federal agency charged with tracking the incidence of disease in America, more than 35 percent of U.S. adults are clinically obese. This translates to more than 80 million people. Obesity-related medical conditions include heart disease, stroke, Type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer and these are some of the leading causes of preventable deaths. Plus, the cost of obesity is staggering. The CDC estimated the annual medical costs of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion and the medical costs for people who are obese were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight. Sterile statistics often obscure the human misery of obesity. Being chronically overweight takes a serious toll on the health and happiness of those it affects. Just ask Brandy Prince,

Why a New U.S. Government Study Supports Treating Age-Related Sexual Dysfunction for Low Testosterone in Men

Dangerous side-effects such as blindness have also been reported by users of these sexual enhancement drugs.   One of many articles in the New York Times noted that erectile dysfunction (ED) is a problem that afflicts about a third of men in their 50s and half of men in their 60s. This condition affects tens of millions of men and it is but one of several sexual maladies. According to the article, “for couples on a limited budget, the cost of drugs like Viagra or Cialis, at about $15 a pill, and not covered by most private and federal insurance plans, can be prohibitive to use on a regular basis.” Dangerous side-effects such as blindness have also been reported by users of these sexual enhancement drugs. What if there was another way to treat sexual dysfunction in older men? Research from U.S. government-sponsored testosterone

Smoothing Out Those Wrinkles Using One’s Own Blood

For generations, well-meaning mothers, fathers and even grandparents have dispensed little nuggets of wisdom which are offered as a way to help a young person gain a little advantage over their contemporaries. One of these “bon mots” is a classic bit of self-help:  “you never get a second chance to make a good first impression.” This advice is even more relevant for adults than it is to children and, for better or worse, the part of the body which leads to many first impressions is the face. It suggests age, health, vitality, attractiveness and beauty. While this might seem to be superficial – everyone knows it’s what’s “inside” that makes a person special – the fact remains that a person’s face is the primary source of any first impression. So, what happens when one meets a new acquaintance and their face looks tired, gray and wrinkled? It may not be