Preventing Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s Disease: Reducing Your Risk

As we age, it’s natural to be concerned about our changing bodies and minds as well as how these changes will affect our livelihood. One growing concern for many is the potential for developing Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. Nearly 6 million Americans over 65 years old are living with Alzheimer’s, and researchers predict the numbers will continue to increase. While many studies have been conducted, and are ongoing, scientists have not yet proven any one treatment to cure or prevent Alzheimer’s and dementia. However, renowned scientists and researchers worldwide do agree on a few promising strategies that can significantly reduce your risk. Today, we want to shed some light on preventative measures that can help reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. 1. Protect Your Heart What’s good for your heart is good for your brain. Maintaining a healthy cardiovascular system is critical for maintaining a healthy brain. Risk

Speed Training Shows Promise in Putting Off Dementia – What Else Can You Do?

A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques.   There is new hope for preventing a tragic, incurable disease which affects more than five million Americans who are 65 and older – dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, “A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques. Researchers found that a total of 11 to 14 hours of speed training has the potential to cut by as much as 48 percent the risk of developing dementia 10 years later.”The results of this study, entitled "Advanced Cognitive Training

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