Melatonin

Melatonin- For MORE Than Just Sleep

Melatonin: A powerful antioxidant for sleep, preventing disease and so much more . AUTHOR Dr. Terri DeNeui, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC CATEGORY Melatonin SOCIAL @EVEXIASMEDICAL The hormone melatonin has long been touted for supporting a good nights sleep but does it really work? And do the benefits of melatonin stop there? If better sleep, immune system support, preventing disease or weight loss matter to you, understanding how this powerhouse antioxidant works could set the stage for better health. Along with supporting the body’s circadian rhythm, research suggests melatonin may help ward off inflammation, obesity and diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease and more. Let’s take a deeper dive into how melatonin works (for sleep and disease prevention) and a closer look at melatonin supplements (dosage, side effects, etc.).

How One Nurse Practitioner Arms Her Immune System to Fight Viruses and Diseases like COVID-19

As a Doctor of Nursing Practice and former emergency room nurse, staying healthy has always been important to me. If you’re working on the front lines during the coronavirus crisis—healthcare, grocery store, sanitation, delivery workers and first responders, to name a few—I’m sure your health is a priority, too. Amid the current pandemic, people keep asking me what I do for me, my patients and my family to keep our immune systems strong. Below are my top five tips for optimizing immune system function. None of the following information should be considered to be medical advice for anyone with whom I have not established a healthcare provider-patient relationship as required by law and medically ethical practice guidelines.    AUTHOR Dr. Terri DeNeui, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC CATEGORY COVID-19 SOCIAL @EVEXIASMEDICAL Dr. Terri’s

The Holidays: A SAD(Seasonal Affective Disorder) State of Affairs

When the days get shorter and the temperature turns cooler, most people put on a sweater and add another log on the fire. Others, however, find it difficult to even get out of bed. This winter depression is widespread and it can often be debilitating.   Mental health practitioners have a medical term for this type of depression which is related to the change in the season. It is called Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and, according to the Mayo Clinic, an estimated 5 percent of the population experience symptoms such as: Irritability Tiredness or low energy Problems getting along with other people Hypersensitivity to rejection Heavy, "leaden" feeling in the arms or legs Oversleeping Appetite changes, especially a craving for foods high in carbohydrates Weight gain American Family Physician notes that women are more likely to experience SAD than men. When this condition is

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