Alzheimer’s disease

The Vital Role of Hormone Therapy in Managing Dis-ease

Our healthcare system is facing unprecedented challenges with the recent pandemic of coronavirus and ensuing SARS Cov2, or COVID-19, and it is vital healthcare providers keep their patients active and healthy so as to not over burden a vulnerable system. AUTHOR Dr. Terri DeNeui, DNP, APRN, ACNP-BC CATEGORY COVID-19 SOCIAL @EVEXIASMEDICAL As an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner researching and practicing advanced endocrinology concepts over the past 12 years, I have recognized an overarching theme: hormones are active and play a vital role in every single body system. The far-reaching impact of restoring hormone homeostasis on health-related quality of life is an often-misunderstood phenomenon in both the healthcare and lay communities. With the additional burden of stress these uncertain times adds to an already encumbered psyche, classifying hormone therapies as inessential

Alzheimer’s Disease: Reducing Your Risk

As we age, it’s natural to be concerned about our changing bodies and minds as well as how these changes will affect our livelihood. One growing concern for many is the potential for developing Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. Nearly 6 million Americans over 65 years old are living with Alzheimer’s, and researchers predict the numbers will continue to increase. While many studies have been conducted, and are ongoing, scientists have not yet proven any one treatment to cure or prevent Alzheimer’s and dementia. However, renowned scientists and researchers worldwide do agree on a few promising strategies that can significantly reduce your risk. Today, we want to shed some light on preventative measures that can help reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. 1. Protect Your Heart What’s good for your heart is good for your brain. Maintaining a healthy cardiovascular system is critical for maintaining a healthy brain. Risk

EVEXIAS embraces International Women’s Day: Be Bold For Change.

After experiencing menopause, Carol Dogans was having hot flashes, difficulty with thinking clearly, weight gain issues, and trouble staying motivated to exercise. “I lacked confidence,” she said. “I lost it because I could not think, and my mind and my body were failing me.” Dogans, 52, who works as a retirement plan consultant at Rockwall Bank, decided to be bold and make a positive change in her life by joining the EVEXIAS Wellness Group at Rockwall. “I said I’m going to bite the bullet -- and it changed my life when I chose EVEXIAS,” she said. “I didn’t realize how out of myself I was until I got EVEXIAS.” Since December 2015, Dogans has naturally lost 6 lbs. She attributes her weight loss to following an EVEXIAS wellness plan that was specifically designed for her. “I went from not being my confident self, being very afraid, because of what

Why Couch Potatoes Have Smaller Brains

Television audience research notes that in the fall and winter, everyone, especially men, spends a great deal of time watching sports. This is good news for the sponsors of the NCAA and the NFL but bad news for the health of these so-called “couch potatoes” who are spending vast amounts of time watching. Based on a recent study, this lack of physical activity can have unintended consequences for the brain. Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The Founder of Evexias Medical Centers, Terri DeNeui, DNP, ACNP, APRN-BC, was asked to evaluate this research and offer her insights on how a sedentary lifestyle affects the size and health of the brain. Want some help getting off that couch? Click

Speed Training Shows Promise in Putting Off Dementia – What Else Can You Do?

A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques.   There is new hope for preventing a tragic, incurable disease which affects more than five million Americans who are 65 and older – dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, “A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques. Researchers found that a total of 11 to 14 hours of speed training has the potential to cut by as much as 48 percent the risk of developing dementia 10 years later.”The results of this study, entitled "Advanced Cognitive Training