Yearly Archives: 2016

Yo-Yo Dieting May be Killing You

person on a scale The worldwide obesity epidemic continued in 2016, despite aggressive educational programs, public awareness of its ramifications and countless changes in the ways processed foods are prepared. It seems to be getting worse, not better. About 38 percent of adults in the U.S. are considered clinically obese and 71 percent are considered overweight, based on research from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. This has led to an explosion of obesity-related chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Billions of dollars have been spent on preventive programs, diets and medical treatments, but the deadly trend continues. To make matters worse, it is estimated that after losing weight by means of extreme diets and exercise, about 80 percent regain the weight after a short amount of time. According to recent research, rapidly and repeatedly losing and regaining weight may increase the risk

The Holidays: A SAD(Seasonal Affective Disorder) State of Affairs

When the days get shorter and the temperature turns cooler, most people put on a sweater and add another log on the fire. Others, however, find it difficult to even get out of bed. This winter depression is widespread and it can often be debilitating.   Mental health practitioners have a medical term for this type of depression which is related to the change in the season. It is called Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and, according to the Mayo Clinic, an estimated 5 percent of the population experience symptoms such as: Irritability Tiredness or low energy Problems getting along with other people Hypersensitivity to rejection Heavy, "leaden" feeling in the arms or legs Oversleeping Appetite changes, especially a craving for foods high in carbohydrates Weight gain American Family Physician notes that women are more likely to experience SAD than men. When this condition is

Processed Foods: Are they Causing Your Migraine Headaches?

There are more than 40 million people in the United States who regularly suffer from debilitating migraine headaches, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Their loss of productivity is overshadowed by the blinding pain of these headaches. For many years, certain foods were associated with the onset of migraine headaches and until recently, this has been largely anecdotal. However, new research on this subject found that people who suffer from migraines may be reacting to nitrate. Foods such as processed meats, leafy vegetables and wine have a high level of nitrates, which suggested to the researchers that these foods might play a role in the onset of migraine headaches. Do you suffer from migraines? We might be able to help.  One of the Root Causes of Migraines: Processed Foods Terri DeNeui  is a nurse practitioner and the founder of Evexias Medical Centers (link to contact

Before Taking All Those Pills for Your Multiple Medical Conditions, Read This. It Could Save Your Life.

As the Baby Boomer generation gets older, the medications to help them stay healthier have gotten better. Unfortunately, this has led to unintended consequences. Physicians and medical groups are concerned that the entire population and especially those who are older are over-medicated. According to a news report in the Wall Street Journal, about 40 percent of patients who are 60 and older regularly take as many as five medications simultaneously. This has caused a situation where the “cure” has the potential of being more deleterious than the “disease.” As a result, doctors are beginning to de-prescribe medications. There are even websites sprouting up to help patients with multiple medical conditions and drug regimens sort out this very dangerous calculus. According to Cara Tannenbam, a geriatrician and scientific director of the Institute of Gender and Health at the Canadian Institutes of Health Research in Montreal who was quoted in the

How Vitamin D Reduces the Risk of Asthma

Asthma is a serious health problem in the United States and in other developed countries around the world.  According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the federal agency charged with tracking incidence of disease, about 17.7 million adults and 6.3 million children in the U.S. are living with asthma - a respiratory condition caused by inflammation and obstruction of the airways. While the causes of asthma remain unclear and no cure for this disease has been found, its symptoms - such as wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest pain and tightness - can be triggered by exposure to allergens and irritants. These include grass or weed pollen, molds, dust mites, pollutions, smoke and other elements found in the air of urban environments. There are medications which can help manage symptoms of these asthma attacks, but a new study suggests that a well-known and easily available vitamin may reduce the risks of

Why Couch Potatoes Have Smaller Brains

Television audience research notes that in the fall and winter, everyone, especially men, spends a great deal of time watching sports. This is good news for the sponsors of the NCAA and the NFL but bad news for the health of these so-called “couch potatoes” who are spending vast amounts of time watching. Based on a recent study, this lack of physical activity can have unintended consequences for the brain. Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, according to a study published in the online issue of Neurology® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The Founder of Evexias Medical Centers, Terri DeNeui, DNP, ACNP, APRN-BC, was asked to evaluate this research and offer her insights on how a sedentary lifestyle affects the size and health of the brain. Want some help getting off that couch? Click

New Research Makes a Strong Case for a Personalized Approach to Weight Loss and Nutrition

“One size fits all” approaches such as using the food pyramid to illustrate the ideal quantity and types of food have been ineffective and, instead, resulted in what the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) calls an “obesity epidemic.”   Over the years and despite their best intentions, nutrition specialists have largely failed to help children and adults develop healthier eating habits, including consuming less red meat and reducing salt. “One size fits all” approaches such as using the food pyramid to illustrate the ideal quantity and types of food have been ineffective and, instead, resulted in what the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) calls an “obesity epidemic.” In a recent European study entitled “Food4Me”, 1,607 adults across seven countries were randomized to one of four treatment groups. In addition to a control group which was given conventional dietary

A Great First Impression Starts with a Younger Looking Face – Dermal Fillers Can Help

For me, the human face is the most important subject of the cinema. ~Ingmar Bergman The human face has always fascinated artists and scientists. Beauty, sadness and the entire continuum of human emotions are immediately evident from a brief glimpse of a face. A person’s face communicates on a basic level. For example, even seconds after being born, babies begin the process of facial recognition so complicated that even computer scientists are just beginning to understand it. Health and vitality – both critical to making a positive first impression – are perceived by others based on facial appearance. No one wants bags around the eyes or mouth, wrinkles on the forehead or dull, gray facial skin tone. However, many cringe at the thought of undergoing plastic surgery.  For these individuals, non-surgical dermal fillers might be the answer to a more healthy-looking face. Are you ready to have a younger-looking

Speed Training Shows Promise in Putting Off Dementia – What Else Can You Do?

A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques.   There is new hope for preventing a tragic, incurable disease which affects more than five million Americans who are 65 and older – dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, “A new, 10 year study showed that speed training – computer exercises that get users to visually process information more quickly – beat memory and reasoning exercises, the two other popular brain training  techniques. Researchers found that a total of 11 to 14 hours of speed training has the potential to cut by as much as 48 percent the risk of developing dementia 10 years later.”The results of this study, entitled "Advanced Cognitive Training

Why Angela’s Pre-Existing Medical Condition was Preventing Her from Losing Weight

Medications for treating a pre-existing medical condition can often lead to weight gain in the patients taking them. In situations where a person is already overweight, the “cure” can often be more dangerous than the “disease.”   This no-win situation was recently faced by Angela Rodriguez, a member of the clinical staff at EVEXIAS Medical Centers, , in Rockwall, Texas. She was taking medications to control an existing condition and their side effect was increased weight.  Join her as she shares her story of taking back her life by modifying her dosage and losing excess weight. Making a Difficult Choice “In preparation for an appointment with my endocrinologist last year, I noticed that I had gained more than 30 pounds since the previous year,” Angela said. “I have always been in the obese weight range, but at this time I weighed 210 pounds!